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AYCH: A PROJECT WITH VALUE

The Atlantic Youth Creative Hubs project begins its work with the youngest of the house.

Through AychKids this European project has several main objectives:

– Disseminate the values of aych to children throughout Europe.
– Create activities for the youngest that have relation with the new technologies.
– Contribute to the dissemination of the aychocean program among children to continue the struggle of a world without plastic.

Our project believes that education has to reach the whole society but that children have to find tools outside the academic environment, and even through European projects; It is important that the shared work of educating comes from different areas of our societies.

Soon we can enjoy the adventures of Drop and Friends. !!!

QUESTIONS: ENRIQUE RODRIGUEZ

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Today a person with a long career in the configuration of European projects answers our questions. Enrique Rodríguez is the Head of the Department of International Initiatives and European Affairs of the City of Gijón, one of the two partners of Aych in Spain.

The City Council of Gijón already has extensive experience in European projects, what makes Aych different from the rest of the projects?

The AYCH Project has an aspect that makes it different and attractive and is that it works directly with people, with young people in our environment. This element makes AYCH a project that is close, direct and much easier to transmit. Sometimes European projects are abstract or excessively technical, but with AYCH we find a project close to the citizen. The beneficiaries of the project will participate in transnational meetings, training projects, and they will have the opportunity to meet other young people, as well as trainers from other European countries. At a time when the European project is being questioned, this closeness is, without a doubt, the most outstanding element.

Tell us briefly how you think Aych may be important for young Asturians.

One of the data that appears in the project is the high rate of unemployment among young people in the European Atlantic region, especially in Spain. Well, from Gijón we believe that AYCH can be a piece that contributes to the development of activities among young people that encourage the start-up of projects of a business nature. The interaction between the activities that are launched in the project with other local initiatives are very important for the consolidation of ideas that may arise in the Creative Transnational Jams. In addition, these projects could also have the European added value that any of the proposals resulting from all the exchanges and training that may occur during the life of the project may have.

The Atlantic Youth Creative Hubs project is aimed at young people from 14 to 30 years old. Is there a concrete profile of participation in the project and could you advance what is the closest thing you are going to do from the City Council of Gijón for these young people?

In our case we have decided to bet on the development of the project in the field of industries and services 4.0 in order to seek synergies and meetings both with other projects that are being developed in Gijon, and with local partners with whom we have been collaborating in multiple initiatives . Specifically, the collaboration with the University through two Chairs, Gijón Smart and Gijón Media Lab, is fundamental. The young people who participate in the AYCH project, in their Creative Jams, come essentially from this collaboration with the University. Throughout the project there will be more activities that will allow us to collaborate with other social entities and other profiles of young people. This is one of the strong points of the project. The diversity of young people who can participate in it.

Exeter MBA Alumni Conference

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University of Exeter: Business School, MBA Alumni Conference, 23 November 2018
A fabulous and immersive day at University of Exeter Business School, thinking about the New Economy:
  • How emerging business models challenge established ways of working
  • The need for sustainable business practices that respect and conserve limited resources
  • The challenges of new technology and its effect on the way we work and live
For me this day resonated with some of the raison d’etre of Atlantic Youth Creative Hubs. I have made short notes to share on topics and I have made some interesting and promising connections which I will help develop and share over the next few days.
Agenda:
Welcome: Professor David Bruce Allen
Keynote: Ed Mayo, Secretary general of Co-operatives UK
Talk : Professor of Leadership and Head of Management, Alex Gerbasi PhD
Talk: Sandra Norval, MD, Catalicity Ltd
Talk : Dr Stuart Robinson, Director of Exeter MBA
Panel debate
First Topic:
Make developing relationships part of your job
Alex Gerbasi PhD who is Professor of Leadership and Head of Management at the University of Exeter Business School talked about her research and experience of relationships and networking. She urged everyone to invest in their own development by consciously making developing relationships part of your job, and to think “who do you know, who knows you and how do they know one another?”
Many of us have networks which are frequently characterised by:
 Immediacy – where you are right now
Proximity – contacts you often see
Similarity – contacts who are like yourself
Relational Inertia – its easy to stay the same and not to change
But we can all thrive, grow and deliver by improving our networks by:

 Diversity – Including people beyond your area of immediate interest and expertise. This is important for inter-disciplinary working and for more mobile working opportunities.

Depth – Including people who are more experienced/senior and less experienced/senior as well as equivalent, in short up, down and sideways

I want to apply this to AYCH:

How can our Young People use AYCH for developing relationships which help them thrive, grow and deliver in the New Economy:
 
Always think about your security and safety. Over 18 years old? Perhaps use professional networking sites to develop relationships which will help with career mobility. When they are participating in AYCH events use the opportunity to have conversations with new people. Aim to think about:

Diversity – Include other young people from thier own and other nations they meet at the Creative Jams, as Interns etc. Connect with young people with the similar and different skills and interests.

Depth– Include people who are more experienced/senior and less experienced/senior as well as equivalent to themselves. Connect with experts, and AYCH team members.ap

QUESTIONS: RICHARD DOAK

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Today Richard Doak visits us to talk about his work at Aych and with young people from Devon County. Space works in several centres directly with the young people and Richard makes a personalized accompaniment that motivates them in their futures.

Can you tell us what is your work in Space and how do you work with young people?

My role is AYCH Project lead worker. I am a qualified Senior youth support worker with a specialism in music technology,  I am also a sports coach, archery teacher and climbing instructor. I have been working with young people for over 8 years,  running various successful Youth projects mainly around music delivery in the wider community. The way I work with young people is to allow them the opportunity to make their own decisions and mistakes on the way the projects they are part of go. My role is to facilitate, Inspire and support their ideas and decisions, helping them to reflect and evaluate their learning.

How do you think that Aych can change the life of the young people you work with?

Here in Devon, we are part of a large rural community. We took the decision at space to take this project away from the cities and out into the wider community giving young people in smaller towns, A chance to have their voices heard. We have created 3 hubs in which the AYCH  project will work from trying to spread them out across the county of Devon. One in the North, One in the south and one in the middle of the County. All of these areas face rural deprivation, poor transport networks, high youth unemployment and a disconnect from the wider UK. With this international Project, we hope to encourage young people to see a bigger picture and connect them with a wider community using are skills as youth workers and utilising modern communications technologies.

What do yo think that can ben the advantages for young people when forming part of a transnational project?

For young people in our county, the opportunity to gain real skills relevant to today’s job market is key.  The opportunity to work across countries is a concept unfamiliar to the young people I am working with. For example, as we prepare to take our group of young entrepreneurs to the next creative jam in Spain 3 out of the 5 young people do not have a passport or access to the internet in their home.  Through the AYCH Project, I can support them through the first ever trip abroad opening new horizons to their outlook. The chance for them to meet other young entrepreneurs from across Europe is an exciting one and for them to gain experiences with professionals from all walks of life is an opportunity not to be missed.

QUESTIONS: OLIVER RAUD

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Oliver Raud answers us with this interesting article to our three questions. Oli is Strategic Funding Manager at Plymouth College of Art

Can you explain what a Creative Jam is?

A Creative Jam is an event, as well as a process that provides participants the opportunity to bring ideas to life, prototyping products and services that respond to an identifiable challenge/issue/problem, based on a selected theme. In the AYCH project, we have chosen a number of themes that include challenges linked to sustainable development, social innovation, environment and climate change, circular economies, waste, mobility, mental health and (un)employment, among other societal issues of our time. As all partners of the AYCH project share borders, we also share a responsibility to develop new solutions centred on human and natural capital that will benefit us and future generations. The Creative Jam is the place to explore this, take risks and create agency among our young people to be the change that is needed in the world. The ultimate ambition for partners is that the Atlantic Youth Creative Hubs Creative Jams will launch the ambitions and careers of a new generation of socially and environmentally responsible young people seeking to tackle societal issues of the future, placing creativity and design at the heart of place-based development and regeneration, empowering them to pursue careers or educational pathways in the Creative Economy and beyond.

What are the benefits that activities like this can bring for the youth of your city?

The benefits are manifold. Through the Creative Jams, as well as the wider project, we teach Key Enabling Technology (Key Enabling Technologies (KETs) are a group of technologies that have a wide range of product applications such as developing low carbon energy technologies, improving energy and resource efficiency, and creating new medical products. They have huge potential to fuel economic growth and provide jobs) and Social Enterprise skills that expose young people to emerging economic opportunities, jobs and growth. This not only helps young people to learn digital, design and creative skills that are increasingly the driver for innovation it also brings them together, collaborating in teams with colleagues from across the Atlantic area. They can learn from one another and build connections, in a fun, dynamic and energising environment, whilst having fun and making new European friends. With a strong link to employers and industry, both delivering workshops and forming part of the judging panel during the Creative Jams, participants are able to speak to, interact with and learn first-hand from experts and entrepreneurs to build aspirations and break down the hierarchies that often impede young people’s progress – it gives a face to employers and young people can better understand the routes into (self)employment and education. Employers also act as mentors and support the personal and professional development of project participants, nurturing the workforce of the future that will need to be adaptable, collaborative and tech-savvy. For the city, it can build a bottom-up movement of young people that are looking to support the development of their local area and a pipeline of talented people that can actively support the growth of local economies and communities. “This project is not just about Smart Cities, it’s about Smart Citizens”.

In what way can an event like this influence the education of a young European?

The learning of these skills enables young Europeans to develop and gain a closer insight into Higher Education and Skills, enterprise and what is needed to gain those valuable attributes that can support their careers and lives. However, as technology is increasingly democratised and easy-to-access – 3D printing, IoT, VR etc. all of which are being taught as part of AYCH), so must education be. A major driving force of AYCH is the development of an education programme, that takes the ethos, values and elements of what is delivered among Higher Education but it is brought out of the institutions and delivered in non-formal settings, thus making it no longer the reserve of just fee-paying students. We believe this is the way that the most change can be affected, for the most amount of people and really gives credence to the notion that education is for all and in an knowledge economy, a skilled and creative workforce and citizens is arguably our most important asset. We want to give agency to our young people and empower them to make positive contributions to society, using an educational programme that is inclusive, entrepreneurial and rich in design-thinking theory, creativity, technology and media. We are looking for people to join us, on this journey, so please feel free to get in touch if you feel can contribute to any of these aspects of the Atlantic Youth Creative Hubs project.

QUESTIONS: RICHARD HAYMAN

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Today we are talking with Richard Hayman (Second one from Right to Left in the picture) Lead Partner of the Atlantic Youth Creative Hubs Project, representing the Devon City Council. Who answers clearly to our three questions of today:

Do you represent an British county in this project, how did you decide to create a project like Atlantic Youth Creative Hubs?

My role within Devon County Council is to optimise the drawdown of all funds including European to deliver the Counties Strategic objectives, amongst which is the provision of opportunities and employment for the youth of Devon. This together with both my and Oli Rauds experience in European funding through various Interreg programmes led us to the idea to create the AYCH model  (probably over a beer) to give creative youngsters the opportunities AYCH is delivering.

Do you think Transnational events or trainings are an important aspect in the formation of young Europeans?

Absolutely it is vitally important that as wide a range of experience both culturally and technologically is available to young people across the EU including the UK!!

We are in a process between the EU and the UK complicated with the arrival of Brexit; How could this situation affect this Aych project and Interreg projects in general?

Firstly our Government have guaranteed funding over the life of any existing Interreg or UK Structural funds currently approved by the EU, so in that sense nothing changes for AYCH and all the other prprojects/programmes which DCC is involved with.  However the political situation is extremely fluid at the moment to say the least!!) and if we leave there are obviously various scenarios

VISIT TO ART IN BREST

As part of the incubation program in Brest, participants visited the ZAAT gallery. The gallery is tackling the issue of empty of vacant units in Brest, by organizing temporary exhibitions of local artists.

Participants had the opportunity to exchange with the artists and about their path towards professionalisation, talking about status, economy, activity and how to turn your passion into an activity.

This visit was organized in partnerhip with CitésLab, an agency supporting entrepreneurs in urban deprived areas.

COMPETITION

WIN an Independent Liverpool card for discounts in 100s of local independent businesses!

To enter this free prize draw… 
1. Like the AYCH Platform page
2. Like this post
3. Share this post!
😁 Easy!

AYCH Platform aims to spark entrepreneurship in young people. You can find more about AYCH Platform by visiting our website!
http://www.aych.pacificstream.info/

Ts&Cs: The competition will close at 12 noon on 22nd April, Bank Holiday Monday, and the winner announced the same day. The prize is as stated.

GIJÓN CREATIVE JAM VIDEO

Have you seen our video of the Creative Jam?. I’m sure you’ll like it!!!

SOFA WITH ENTREPRENEURS IN PLYMOUTH

Today, we are having a great chat on the sofa with entrepreneurs to learn how to run a business every day as part of the AYCH Incubation Programme, in Plymouth.

“The successful warrior is the average person, with laser-like focus” Bruce Lee

The Aych incubation program is designed so that non-formal education reaches all young people in an informal, close and close way in which they feel a total accompaniment.